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Photo credits Antek Olesik

O Piotrze Kozłowskim

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Polish soloist and chamber musician Dr. Piotr Kozłowski, now a part of Miami's musical landscape, a graduate of the Fryderyk Chopin University of Music in Warsaw and an alum of the esteemed Frost School of Music at the University of Miami. His performances across Europe and the United States showcase his versatility and musical expression.

 

Piotr's musical philosophy revolves around a holistic approach, melding precision with sensibility. He has a special affinity for chamber and contemporary music, blending the standard and contemporary repertoire. Piotr also cherishes the baroque and early 20th-century pieces, particularly his favorite composer, Karol Szymanowski.

Recent projects include the Piano-Percussion Chamber Works, Bach's Goldberg Variations, and a collaboration with cellist Ruth Stokes.

 

Piotr Kozłowski has been mentored by artists like Avedis Kouyoumdjian, Piotr Paleczny, Jeffrey Zeigler, and Svet Stoyanov. He received a Doctorate in Musical Arts under the guidance of Professor Kevin Kenner and Dr. Naoko Takao.

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Photo credits João Felipe

"I think the work of a pianist, like the work of any artist, is a two-way work – first on the technique, and then on the imagination. That is, you have to have such a large vocabulary to be able to convey everything you imagine, to describe the world in such words to find the poetry, find the magic in it, but also to make it this world and not some other world."

Upcoming events:

Crumb – Music for a Summer Evening (Makrokosmos III)
38:33

Crumb – Music for a Summer Evening (Makrokosmos III)

I. Nocturnal Sounds (The Awakening) 0:17 II. Wanderer-Fantasy 6:00 III. The Advent – Hymn for the Nativity of the Star-Child 11:19 IV. Myth 19:58 V. Music of the Starry Night 26:43 Antek Olesik, Noel Q. Holloway, percussion Piotr Kozłowski, Shih-Man Weng, pianos https://www.pkozlowski.com Recorded on April 28th 2023 at the Frost School of Music, University of Miami George Crumb (1929-2022) was an American composer who studied with Boris Blacher and Ross Lee Finney. His influences include poetry by Federico García Lorca as well as music of Claude Debussy, Gustav Mahler, and Charles Ives.1 Crumb’s oeuvre has been described as atmospheric, vividly expressive, and ritualistic— expressions that are normally descriptive of the graphic arts or theater. He explored the sonic possibilities of instruments of the percussion family with fervor, creating new, extended techniques and unique combinations of sounds.2 Makrokosmos III is a five-movement composition for two amplified pianos and percussion (including 2 players). Crumb states in his notes: "The combination of two pianos and percussion instruments was, of course, first formulated by Béla Bartók in his Sonata of 1937, and it is curious that other composers did not subsequently contribute to the genre. Bartók was one of the very first composers to write truly expressive passages for the percussion instruments; since those days there has been a veritable revolution in percussion technique and idiom and new music has inevitably assimilated these developments. The battery of percussion instruments required for Summer Evening is extensive and includes vibraphone, xylophone, glockenspiel, tubular bells, crotales (antique cymbals), bell tree, claves, maracas, sleighbells, wood blocks and temple blocks, triangles, and several varieties of drums, tam-tams, and cymbals."3 The piece was dedicated to Gilbert Kalish, James Freeman, Raymond DesRoches, and Richard Fitz.4 The performance takes approximately forty minutes, and it encompasses three extended movements: Nocturnal Sounds (Awakening), The Advent, and Music of the Starry Night, which interlace two intermezzi: Wanderer-Fantasy and Myth. Three larger movements are preceded by poetic quotations by Salvatore Quasimodo, Blaise Pascal, and Reiner Maria Rilke which “find their symbolic resonance in the sounds of Summer Evening.”5 These references together with “a sort of mosaic design,”6 produce a one-of- a-kind edifice that defies divisions between the genres of art. Work on Makrokosmos III has been especially meaningful as it combines the poetry of a word, sound, and time. ~Piotr Kozłowski 1 Richard Steinitz, “Crumb, George,” Grove Music Online, 2013; accessed November 21, 2022, https://doi.org/10.1093/gmo/9781561592630.article.A2249252. 2 Thomas Siwe, Artful Noise: Percussion Literature in Twentieth Century (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2020), 127. 3 George Crumb, “Music for a Summer Evening,” in George Crumb & The Alchemy of sound: Essays on His Music, ed. Steven Bruns, Ofer Ben-Amots, Michael D. Grace (Colorado Springs, CO: The Colorado College Music Press, 2005), 311. 4 Ibid., 310. 5 Ibid.: “’Nocturnal Sounds’ is inscribed with an excerpt from Quasimodo: ‘Odo risonanze effimere, oblío di piena note nell’acqua stellat’ (‘I hear ephemeral echoes, oblivion of full night in the starred water’); ‘The Advent’ is associated with a passage from Pascal: ‘Le silence éternel des espaces infinis m’effraie’ (‘The eternal silence of infinite space terrifies me’), and the last movement, ‘Music of the Starry Night,’ cites these transcendentally beautiful images of Rilke: ‘Und in den Nächten fällt die schwere Erde aus allen Sternen in die Einsamkeit. Wir alle fallen. Und doch ist Einer, welcher dieses Fallen unendlich sanft in seinen Händen hält.‘ (‘And in the nights the heavy earth is falling from all the stars down into loneliness. We are all falling. And yet there is One who holds this falling endlessly gently in His hands.’).” 6 Ibid., 311.